More Sheep and Wool Festival Preparation

Just a taste of what I’m bringing to the Vermont Sheep and Wool Festival this year.  I have about 100 skeins of yarn, hot off the mill(?), soft, huggable pelts from lambs and adults, hand-carded batts, some natural and some hand-dyed, and patterns.  My mom wrote a nifty new cowl pattern that we are excited to share with you!

Some Sheep Updates, because I like doing them:

  • With all of the maintenance mowing we’ve been able to do with the new tractor, I can finally say that the sheep are really thriving.  It’s hard to find a spine or ribs on the Bluefaced Leicesters, and the Cormos are looking better, brighter and healthier than ever.
  • Peggy, who is probably about ten years old, is still going strong.  I thought I should cull her, but she has teeth enough and is keeping up with the herd very comfortably.
  • Tardis and Dalek are getting ever friendlier.  Eleanor is a ham, and is fat enough to be made into a ham.  She is the size of my adult Cormos at the age of six months.  Little Moose is taller but leaner, and Marianne is lagging in growth a little.  She gets extra grain at feeding time.
  • The rams deeply resent being separated from the ewes, but have nevertheless been great ram-bassadors in my front yard, greeting passers-by.
  • Eleanor, Chickadee and Phoebe (sheep) will be at the Sheep and Wool Festival, along with me, Matt and Phoebe (person).  I earnestly can’t wait to see you there.

 

 

 

 

 

Chorizo!

The much-anticipated Chorizo is here!

It’s not like the Merguez we made in June.  Without the benefit of added pork fat that we put in the Merguez, this sausage is, frankly, more like ground meat in a tube than sausage.  Cooking it is a delicate affair, since fat creates juiciness and crispness.  On the upside, this sausage is leaner and healthier than regular sausage.  Even better?  This sausage has fabulous lamb flavor with the rich garlic, pepper and oregano of traditional pork Chorizo.

Still, it’s tasty and flavorful meat that just begs to be part of soups and stews.  Use it to make rich, creamy soup or Cuban beans and rice.  The off-grill possibilities are endless and perfect for fall and winter.

We don’t fault brisket for not being prime rib, and neither need we fault this sausage for being intended for flavoring soups and stews rather than frying.  That said, I’m charging less than I intended to for this sausage because it is less versatile than other sausages.

Please send me an email or give me a call if you’d like to try some tasty sausage!   I am offering 10% off ten or more packages.  Sheepandpickle at gmail is the email you’ll be looking for.

Preparing for the Vermont Sheep and Wool Festival

Somehow, getting ready for my second Vermont Sheep and Wool Festival seems like it will be more challenging than the first.

First, I am not currently certain whether I will have yarn or not for the show.  With three weeks to go, it would be helpful to know if yarn is happening or not.   The issue is that the owner of my mill recently had surgery, and I know from experience that recovery is pretty variable, so we don’t know if he will have time to process my order or not.   I am hoping to bring the fleece to sell raw if spinning can’t take place, but it’s all up in the air at present.  This is not a complaint or an indictment of anyone- it’s just the way that cookies crumble when you’re dealing with small businesses owned by real people, and I know that.

Second, I am hoping to have sausages back soon from the lambs I dropped off a few weeks ago.  The slaughterhouse told me that they had run low on casings, so I await them awaiting their casing order.  I will not have sausage for sale at the Vermont Sheep and Wool Festival.  The logistics of bringing it and the insurance and licensing implications thereof are too much to deal with.  If you want some sausage (and you do, based on the deliciousness of the last batch!), contact me now.

Third, with uncertainty about yarn hanging over my head, I’ve been madly processing all of the non-yarn fleece into batts for sale.  I now have a cellar full of beautiful natural-colored and hand-dyed batts.  I will confess that I am scared because I’m a newbie dyer and I have a persistent nightmare about getting mountains of phone calls about dye washing out of finished knits!   Here’s hoping I didn’t mess it all up too badly.  Does anyone know of a way to test a dye-job that doesn’t chew up too much of the dyed material?

And Fourth, I learned recently through helpful Facebook crowdsourcing that brochures are hopelessly old-fashioned and that post-cards are the way to go.  It’s likely that friends of the farm saved me a fair $100 on printing costs while also updating my tastes.  Thanks, friends!  I designed what I hope will be a very attractive card with some charming sheep photos on it and a list of available products.

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A combination of Eleanor and Little Moose’s fleece