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Gratitude

At 7pm Sunday night, I rolled in to our lumpy driveway after a two hour drive home from the Vermont Sheep and Wool Festival.  The frustrated lambs in the passenger area of the truck murbled slightly as I directed the vehicle down the farm field road and out to pasture.  I turned off the fence, tamped it under the truck doors and released our patient lambs back into pasture.  After two days of petting and poking, they were grateful for a return to green grass and friends.

I am also grateful for a return to green grass and friends, though mine actually happened at the Vermont Sheep and Wool Festival.  Vending at the festival for the fifth year now feels like coming home to friends and family.  I see familiar faces and remember conversations from prior years.  Visitors come to my booth to say that they have driven by my farm recently, or to share the project they made with yarn from my farm.  I am always floored by this – I never take for granted that people might take the time to seek me out to show or tell me that my work has had a little, tiny influence in their lives.

As always, Mom handled the complex knitting questions and helped to bolster the confidence of people who were timid about tackling colorwork projects.  She really has a gift for encouraging and teaching.  I appreciate my mother’s help so much.

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Cutest visitor of the day!
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This beautiful shawl from KnittyMelissa inspired many people to knit one of their own!
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Derby Line Border Leicester Yarn, on display
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Our miniskein array.
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We sold almost all of our roving and much of our BFL yarn.
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Did the ewes miss me while I was gone?  Hard to say…
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Preparing for the Vermont Sheep and Wool Festival

Every year has been a little different at the Vermont Sheep and Wool Festival at the Tunbridge Fairgrounds in Tunbridge, VT, September 30-October 1.  Even if you don’t knit, it’s a ton of fun with great food and lots of opportunities to learn more about fibercraft.

In the past, I have brought natural-color Cormo X yarn – soft yarn in natural white, gray and brown shades.   Additionally, I’ve brought some hand-processed batts for handspinners and felters.

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This year is a little different.  The last run of Cormo X yarn will be for sale, available in eight (yes!) attractive and wearable colors plus three natural shades.  We will be debuting our Bluefaced Leicester yarn, which is soft and silky with a subtle sheen.  I hope you are as excited as I am to touch this awesome yarn.  Our BFL yarn comes in two natural colors and supplies are limited.

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We will also be offering raw fleece in several formats.  We have small packets of hand-selected Bluefaced Leicester and Border Leicester locks for crafting.  Border Leicester fleece is on offer in larger volumes.  I know many handspinners with they could sample more fleeces with a little less commitment to a whole sheep.  I have chosen to offer fleece in smaller purchase units so that you can enjoy a pound or three of quality fleece without being tired of it by the end.  I’ve been there.

Additionally, gorgeous and intriguing pelts made by Vermont Natural Sheepskins will be on offer in both white and natural shades.

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So please come by our booth in the animal barn.  Friendly lambs want to nibble you, and I want to hear what you think of this blog.

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